Contact Lenses

Advancements in technology bring about new contact lenses every year.  Our selection is full of the latest and best performing products for all types of vision correction. This new technology means that we may have a contact lens that works for you, even if you were previously unable to wear contacts. New lenses include bifocal and astigmatism correction. 

Types of lenses:

Conventional Soft Lenses – long term soft lenses (up to one year).

Disposable Soft Lenses – Short term soft lenses (daily to monthly).

Multifocal Soft Lenses – Similar to progressives (no lines).

Toric Soft Lenses – For astigmatism correction.

Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses – Long term rigid lenses (up to one year).

Patients new to contacts and experienced wearers both need to be aware that proper use is very important. When used properly, contact are comfortable and convenient, but improper contact use can lead to ocular complications and long term corneal damage.  

New contact wearers will need to adhere to a wearing schedule that may look something like this:

Day Gas Permeable Lenses Soft Lenses
1 4 hours 6 hours
2 6 hours 8 hours
3 8 hours 10 hours
4 10 hours 12 hours
5 12 hours 12 hours

Your eye doctor will inform you about any best practices for your particular lens type.  All lenses need to be kept clean and disinfected to avoid deposits and possible infections. Read our list below for great tips and instructions

Contact Lens Best Practices:

Follow doctor instruction and directions on the packaging of your contacts and solutions.

Don’t wear lenses longer than suggested. Wearing schedules are important for your eye to adjust.

Remove your lenses at least an hour before bed so that the cornea can breathe sufficiently.

Always clean, disinfect, and rinse lenses when removed. (If they sit unused for 24 hours or longer, they should be cleaned, disinfected and rinsed again before use.)   

Don’t wear contacts overnight if they have not been approved for such use. Always talk to your doctor about overnight use as this will increase the risk of infection.

Schedule contact follow up appointments with your doctor and wear your contacts for 3 hours before coming in for these appointments.

Mind your solutions. Many cannot be used together and certain solutions are appropriate for certain lenses. Only use the solutions recommended by your doctor for your lenses.

Take care to not contaminate solution container bottle tips. Replace solution every three months to prevent bacterial growth.

Use new solution in your contact case every day. This should be enough to completely submerge the lens.

Talk to your doctor if you plan to use your contacts while swimming.

Never place lenses in your mouth to rewet.

Don’t continue wearing your lenses if your eyes become irritated, red, or have vision difficulty.

Take care when applying makeup and lotions. Consider putting contacts in first.

Don’t use tap water when rinsing soft lenses.

Watch for redness, blurriness, and light sensitivity. Call your doctor if there are any sudden changes in the health of your eyes. 

Cosmetic lenses are also available in prescription and non-prescription forms. These are useful for anyone wanting to match color between eyes or add flair to their natural eye color. 

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